Tungtap (Fish Chutney) & Jadoh (Flavored Rice) from Meghalaya

Pork Rice, Blogging Marathon, Northeast Indian Cuisine, Cuisine of Meghalaya, Blogging Marathon

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Meghalaya is another northeastern sister state bordering Assam to the north and Bangladesh to the south. Megha in Sanskrit is cloud and Meghalaya means an abode of clouds. Shillong is the capital and which is known as Scotland of the east. Majority of the population is tribal. The three main tribes in the state are the Khasis, Garos and the Jaintias. There are many more tribes in the minority and some of them are Koch, Halong and Kuki. Meghalaya is one of the three Indian states with a majority of 70% Christian population followed by 13% Hindus. Mizoram and Nagaland are the other two states with majority of Christians. Majority of the Garo (90%) and Khasi (80%) are Christians while majority of Hajong and Koch are Hindus. An interesting thing about this state is that majority of the tribal population follows matrilineal system where lineage and inheritance are traced through women, unlike in rest of India, it is though men.

Pork Rice, Blogging Marathon, Northeast Indian Cuisine, Cuisine of Meghalaya, Blogging Marathon

Rice, meat and fish preparations are a staple in Meghalaya cuisine. Popular dishes among Khasis and Jaintia tribe are Jadoh, Ki Kpu, Tung-rymbai (fermented soya paste) and pickled bamboo shoots. Garos also eat meat but daily food includes rice with kappa. Kapa is prepared with an ingredient called karchi which is made of filtered ash water. Kapa is prepared with both meats and vegetables. Other dishes are minil songa (sticky rice prepared by steaming) and sakkin gata. Info for the state is from wiki.

Anchovies Pickle, Fish Paste, Blogging Marathon, Northeast Indian Cuisine, Cuisine of Meghalaya, Blogging Marathon

Today’s recipes are Khasi delicacies. Tungtap is dry fish paste or chutney and Jadoh is a rice and meat delicacy. Fish is charred and mixed with onion, green chili and red chilies to make this fish chutney. I did not have dry fish so used canned fish instead. I dry roasted it in a pan and since I used oiled anchovies, the fish dried and crumbled into a coarse powder. I wasn’t sure how it would taste and to my utter surprise and delight, it was pretty good. We loved it! Mr.u wanted me to make it again.

Anchovies Pickle, Fish Paste, Blogging Marathon, Northeast Indian Cuisine, Cuisine of Meghalaya, Blogging Marathon

Jadoh is similar to pulao where rice and meat is cooked together. Garam masala spices are not used and only spice used is black pepper. I added couple of green chilies to suite our taste. Husband did not like this but I thought it was ok. When I first tasted it, I didn’t like it either. Since this was the only food I made that weekend for lunch, I ate with Tungtap. With Tungtap, it was not that bad. In fact that afternoon as I was having lunch, I mentioned it in our BM group chat that I did not like Jadoh but is eatable with Tungtap. As I eat it, I stated liking the rice. Mr.U was surprised I was taking multiple serving! I not only ate it that Sunday afternoon, I ate the leftover Jadoh next day for lunch too. I did not care much for the pork in the rice. I don’t cook pork that much at home and only pork I cook at home is grilling it. I picked out the pork and ate the rice.

Pork Rice, Blogging Marathon, Northeast Indian Cuisine, Cuisine of Meghalaya, Blogging Marathon

Source: Northeast Indian Food
Cooking Time: 10 minutes
Serves: 1

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans, 2oz Anchovies (I used anchovies in olive oil) about ¼ cup
  • ½ onion or 1 tbsp. grated Onion
  • ¼ tsp. Chili Powder
  • ½ tsp. Green Chilies chopped or 1 Green Chili

Preparation:

  • Fry the anchovies in a pan until it gets brown and dry.
  • Mix everything together. I did not add salt as the anchovies were salted.
  • Serve it with hot rice and mashed potato. I served it with jodah.

Note:

  • When cooking with dry fish or even canned anchovies, make sure the windows are open, exhaust fan is on and as mentioned in the source recipe, make sure your neighbors are away. 🙂 Though the fish smell wasn’t bad on this day, I will talk more about it in Nagaland post, in couple of days.

Jadoh
Source: Northeast Indian Food
Cooking Time: 20 – 30 minutes
Serves: 2 – 3

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Rice Jasmine
  • 2 tbsp. Oil vegetable
  • 2-4 Bay Leaves
  • 1 small – medium Onion chopped or ¾ cup chopped Onion
  • 1 tbsp. Ginger Paste
  • 1 tsp. Black Pepper Powder
  • ½ tsp. Tuermeric (I did not measure)
  • 2 Green Chilies chopped
  • 0.73 lbs. Pork top loin cut into small 1”x1” pieces (can substitute with chicken)
  • 4 cups Water

Preparation:

  • Wash rice and soak the rice until ready to use. It need not soak it for too long.
  • Cut the pork to desired size and keep it aside.
  • Heat oil in a sauce pan, add bay leaves and fry until they change color.
  • Add onions, ginger paste, turmeric and sauté until oil separates.
  • Add green chilies, pork pieces and fry until pork is light brown in color.
  • Drain rice and add it to the pork mixture and fry for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add salt, 4 cups of water and bring it to a boil.
  • Simmer and cook until rice is cooked.
  • Garnish with cilantro and serve.
  • Jodha is served with Tungrymbai, ferment soy paste and Dohneiiong, pork with sesame seeds.
  • I served it with Tungtap.

Note:

  • Hill rice or joha rice or any short grained rice is used for this preparation. I used Jasmine rice. I used 1:2 rice to water ratio and I felt rice was a little sticky. I do not know if that is how Jodah is supposed to be. For not so sticky rice, use less water.

This day in 2012 – Chili Rubbed Roasted Chicken
Recipes I posted this month in 2009, in 2010, in 2011, in 2012 and in 2013.

Events: Linking this to Fabulous Feast Friday, a linky party started by Mireille. This weekend I am hosting edition # 7 along with my co-host Pavani.

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20 thoughts on “Tungtap (Fish Chutney) & Jadoh (Flavored Rice) from Meghalaya

  1. As a khasi I really liked this post im glad you enjoyed it however the jadoh was missing the key ingredient that makes it tasty and thats pork blood thats the star of this dish without it its not jadoh 🙂

    1. Esther, I did not know I was missing the star ingredient. Adding it might enhance the flavor even more. Thanks for letting me know. 🙂

  2. Hey there, I am Shilpa from http://hungrykya.nuvodev.com. I made a vegetarian version of the Jadoh {Khasi Pulao} adding additional black pepper powder for the spiciness and it was great. I will post this in my blog soon. Thanks for sharing such authentic dishes from the North east. Most of us make either the North Indian, South Indian recipes…This is different and looking forward to cook more recipes from your blog.

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