Jonna Rotte ~ Jowar ki Roti ~ Sorghum Flatbread

Jonna Rotte, Jowar ki Roti, Sorghum Roti, Sorghum Indian Flat Bread, Telangana Food, Telangana Cuisine, Telugu Food, Indian Food, South Indian Food, Blogging Marathon, Journey Through the Cuisines, A-Z Challenge, A-Z Telangana Cuisine

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Jonna rotte ~ jowar ki roti is prepared in many Indian states and is not regional only to Telangana. It is a common preparation in rural areas. The first time I saw these rottelu made at home was few years ago when amma found out she was diabetic. Jonnalu ~ jowar ~ sorghum is gluten free and rich in nutrients.

Jonna Rotte, Jowar ki Roti, Sorghum Roti, Sorghum Indian Flat Bread,  Telangana Food, Telangana Cuisine, Telugu Food, Indian Food, South Indian Food, Blogging Marathon, Journey Through the Cuisines, A-Z Challenge, A-Z Telangana Cuisine

When growing up, only rottelu I knew about were wheat flour rotte(lu), which was a common breakfast item. These rottelu are prepared with atta or wheat flour, shaped into a triangle or circle, and prepared similar to North Indian parathas but rolled thinner than parathas. Other breakfast items frequently on the breakfast menu were atukulu, golichina annam ~ poni or poppu annam, attlu, poori and upma. Golichina annam is nothing but Indian style fried rice prepared with leftover rice. Golichina means fried.

Jonna Rotte, Jowar ki Roti, Sorghum Roti, Sorghum Indian Flat Bread,  Telangana Food, Telangana Cuisine, Telugu Food, Indian Food, South Indian Food, Blogging Marathon, Journey Through the Cuisines, A-Z Challenge, A-Z Telangana Cuisine

Jonna rottelu were never prepared at home though I heard about it. I am told, though these were not made at home, it was a common preparation in villages and specially in peasant families. Amma started making it for herself in last few years but I never bothered to make or taste them. Last month I made these rottelu for the first time for this BM. In my first trial, rottelu where shapeless though the taste was fine. I made them again few days later and this time the rottelu were presentable. Difference between these rottelu and the wheat ones is that hot water is used to make the dough and the dough is always covered. The dough is soft and not as stiff as chapati or paratha dough. Jonna rottelu are rolled using hands but I used a rolling pin. I am told jonna rottelu come out really good with freshly ground jonnalu than with store bought jonna pindi (sorghum flour).

Jonna Rotte, Jowar ki Roti, Sorghum Roti, Sorghum Indian Flat Bread,  Telangana Food, Telangana Cuisine, Telugu Food, Indian Food, South Indian Food, Blogging Marathon, Journey Through the Cuisines, A-Z Challenge, A-Z Telangana Cuisine

When making the list for this A-Z series Journey Through Telangana Cuisine, my first choice was J for jonna rotte and I did not even consider other dishes. When drafting the post last night, I tried to list vegetables and dishes starting with ‘J’ and I could not come up with any. Here are few fruits, spices and dishes I could think of starting with ‘J’.

Spices:
Jajikaya – Nutmeg
Jilakara – Cumin
Nuts:
Jeedipappu – Cashew nuts
Fruits:
Jamakaya – Guava
Dishes:
Jonnalu senagala gudalu (sauteed sorghum + black chana), junnu (sweet made with colostrum milk of a cow)

Jonna Rotte, Jowar ki Roti, Sorghum Roti, Sorghum Indian Flat Bread,  Telangana Food, Telangana Cuisine, Telugu Food, Indian Food, South Indian Food, Blogging Marathon, Journey Through the Cuisines, A-Z Challenge, A-Z Telangana Cuisine

Yields: 3 – 4 depending on the size

Ingredients:

  • ¾ cup Jonna Pindi ~ Jowar ka Atta ~ Sorghum Flour (more if required)
  • ½ cup Water
  • ¼ – ½ tsp. Salt (adjust to taste)

Preparation:

  • In a saucepan bring water to boil and turn off the stove. Add salt. When the water is still hot, gradually add ½ cup + 1 tbsp. of flour, mix until flour is evenly mixed and comes together . Cover the pan and let it sit for 5 – 10 minutes until the dough is manageable with hand.
  • Transfer the dough to a plate or to a clean countertop and knead to make a soft dough. If necessary, add some flour. Dough should be softer than chapati or roti dough but not very soft and sticky. Keep the dough covered at all times.
  • Heat a griddle or tawa or a pan to roast rottelu.
  • Divide the dough into 3 equal parts.
  • Take one part of the dough, shape it into a ball, dust some flour and roll the dough ball into a circle. Edges will crack, even it with fingers. Do not apply to much pressure when rolling and gently roll the rotte, turning it around.
  • Gently lift the rotte and transfer to the hot griddle.
  • With a pastry brush or a kitchen towel, brush water on the top of the rotte. This is essential to keep the rotte from cracking
  • Flip the rotte and cook on the other side until rotte is cooked on the other side.
  • Transfer to a plate and keep it covered or wrap it in a cloth or a kitchen towel.
  • Repeat the same with rest of the dough balls.
  • Serve rotte with curry or with some ellipaya karam. I eat mine with some ellipaya karam and oil.

Notes:

  • Use hot water to make the dough.
  • Dough should always be covered.
  • The dough is soft and not as stiff as chapati or paratha dough.

This day in 2014: Thekua from Jharkhand
Events: This post also goes to A-Z Challenge for day 10, letter ‘J’.


Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 63

So far in this A-Z Journey Through Telangana Cuisine,
A for Attu Tunukala Koora
B for Biyyapattlu
C for Chegodi
D for Dondakaya Barada
E for Ellipaya Karam
F for Fenugreek (Menthi) Aaku Pesaru Pappu Koora
G for Garela Pulusu
H for Hyacinth Beans (Anapakaya) Annam
I for Iguru, Goru Chikkudukaya Iguru

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21 thoughts on “Jonna Rotte ~ Jowar ki Roti ~ Sorghum Flatbread

  1. That’s a fantastic rotte Usha, I love this and would always prefer my athamma to make it, they have that art of rolling out these rottelu that I haven’t been able to get used to. The entire setup looks so classic and rustic..very pleasing..

  2. I prepare many millet based rotis like this. Boiling water gives the required stretch as these are gluten free. Your roti looks super inviting with karam…

  3. There are so many different kinds of rotis we see nowadays. Thanks to including different kinds of grains our diet is a lot more diverse than it was before .

  4. I think you made perfect jonna rottelu Usha, that too this being your second time. My MIL perfect jonna rottelu (we are not used to these in Andhra side) and when I tried to make them, I was sweating like hell in the kitchen for 2 hours but all I could manage were mini poori size rotis that were stiff as rocks — never went that way again. I usually add some atta and make rotis — makes my life much easier 🙂

  5. Jonne Roti has come out so good.For the second looks almost perfect.It never comes out good for me,always with cracks..

  6. I have heard that a little expertise is needed to make these rottes. As Pavani mentioned, we don’t prepare them on Andhra side and I have bought a bag of jowar flour only once in my life so far.
    Your rottes are looking great, for it being only your second trial and the setting is perfect for this rustic meal.

  7. Using boiling water to make the aata is what really helps in making this roti. I have had couple of failures where I could have easily hurt someone with this rock hard rotis. But then I always used the boiling water trick and it was much more pliable. Frequently I add whole wheat along with jowar to make it work 🙂

  8. The rustic setting for the jonna rottelu makes it look so authentic. My MIL gave me an idea of making these using the puri press and I make these once in a while.

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